DRONEBOY NEWSLETTER

MARCH 2016

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Welcome to our first ever DroneBoy newsletter. We will publish these from time to time to let you know what we are up to, high in the skies above. Enjoy!Welcome to our first ever DroneBoy newsletter. We will publish these from time to time to let you know what we are up to, high in the skies above. Enjoy!

Molson Canadian
Molson Canadian

Molson Canadian Rooftop Rink

Molson Canadian

FULL ARTICLE: CLICK HERE


Anything For Hockey Campaign


Molson Canadian is doing its part to bring the game of hockey to new heights, literally. Last year, Molson built a professionally made rink in a remote area of the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia, this year, they built a rink, skyhigh, on the rooftop of 120 Adelaide Street West in downtown Toronto.


Molson decided to shoot an epic TV spot on this amazing, one-of-a-kind rink, and shooting with a camera-drone, piloted by the DroneBoy team, was the obvious choice.


For some of the same reasons that building a rink 32 stories up was difficult, this drone shoot was not without its challenges as well.


Monster Truck

FULL ARTICLE: CLICK HERE

"Don't Tell Me How To Live"


Monster Truck is a Canadian rock band from Hamilton, Ontario. We were so excited when DroneBoy was asked to shoot all aerial imagery in the music video for their kick ass new song, "Don't Tell Me How To Live".


The shoot was at a huge gravel quarry site, north of Toronto; the theme revolving around the grittiness of the site, and the just plain awesomeness of the band's presence playing live. The band was set up on this huge gravel crushing machine with tendrils that extended out, into what appeared to be an abyss. The shoot went from day into night, and as it got later the weather got worse and worse...



What we find fascinating at Droneboy is the intersection of existing practices and the application of drones. Photogrammetry is one of those well established practices that is undergoing a monumental shift in its application as a result of drones. The science of photogrammetry is not new and is a widely used tool to perform measurements such as distance, grade, volume, etc… using photographs of large scale projects (eg construction sites, buildings, stockpiles, etc…). Drones are great at taking pictures of large scale objects. Put the two together and you open up a whole new set of uses and applications.

FULL ARTICLE: CLICK HERE